The Virago Press #BooksForChange Challenge Part 3

If you missed part one of this challenge, you can find it here and part two is here.


Virago is a British publishing company, founded in 1973, with the intention of giving voice and publishing presence to female authors. Since then, the mission statement has expanded to include authors and reprinted works with a broader positive intention; LGBTQ texts; books written by non-binary authors; works which reflect a diversity of neurological conditions and mental illnesses; and lots more. You can find Virago online here, where they have a fascinating timeline of their own history.

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations.” Five recipes inspired by literary favourites – the winter edition.

That quote is from Oscar Wilde by the way, a man after my own bitter introverted heart. If you’re cooking for a crowd, for yourself or bringing something to a party then why not try one of these literary-inspired recipes inspired by wintery tomes.

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2016 Cundill Prize – Thomas W Laquer, The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains

It may not be as famous as the Booker or the Pulitzer, but recently McGill University in Montreal announced the 2016 winner of their Cundill Prize in Historical Literature. The Cundill Prize is the largest non-fiction history prize in the world. It’s important because it reflects a genuine desire to reward historians and researchers for publications which are “determined to have had, or likely to have, a profound literary, social and intellectual impact.” The Cundill Prize website states that they aim to recognise “outstanding works of non-fiction that are grounded in scholarly research while retaining wide appeal and interest to the general public.”

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How to read from 5 different genres when you’re flat broke

If you don’t live near a library then this is the post for you. Whether you’re a cash-strapped student, you’ve overspent, or you’re miles away from pay-day, there are ways to indulge your bookish habit without spending more than you’d like to. This post is going to clue you in on five ways to read from five different genres, at no extra cost at all.

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