Orwell, Nationalism, Brexit and Historical Foresight – An editorial, post-referendum.

The London Palace Coat of Arms features a Lion and a Unicorn: the two animals that George Orwell used to title a now infamous essay about nationalism, class and Britain’s lack of European identity. I’m writing about it today in a ponderous post that will look at English Socialism, historical understandings of our apparent island-identity, and the way that Orwell always seems to have known what to say.

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s: Truman Capote

Truman Capote’s novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s is almost certainly more famous as the 1961 film, starring Audrey Hepburn. Or possible the 1993 song, by Deep Blue Something. Either way, this first ‘Looks at Books’ blog post is going to examine Breakfast at Tiffany’s – a mid-century tale of cafe-society girls, roaming cats and the mean reds.

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The Penguincubator: books don’t just fall from the sky.

Today’s post is a real weird one- we’ve all used vending machines and we’ve all read books. But I’ve never bought a book from a vending machine. Nevertheless, there’s a real history to be told, because they crop up more often than you might think. Today we’re taking a little microhistorical look at literary vending devices- starting with the Penguincubator.

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