Motivation, Self-Esteem and Patience

I’ve started this blog post a few times already. I had a smarmy quote from Goodreads. I had one of those stock photos of a smiley woman in a field. Then I had a flippant jibe about how it’s pointless anyway in the face of impending nuclear destruction.

Then I deleted it all and closed the window, because it felt a bit pointless. Today’s post is about that pointless feeling, and balancing the weight of expectation against the reality of your capabilities. 

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I Capture the Castle: Dodie Smith

A young woman; a ramshackle English castle; a glamourous step-mother; a forgetful father writing strange encoded books; a quiet and mysterious servant boy; two interloping American brothers; green skin and outdoor baths. This is middle class decline in 1930s Britain, but it’s also a fairytale love story in Dodie Smith’s quintessentially English coming of age story, I Capture the Castle.

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2016 Cundill Prize – Thomas W Laquer, The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains

It may not be as famous as the Booker or the Pulitzer, but recently McGill University in Montreal announced the 2016 winner of their Cundill Prize in Historical Literature. The Cundill Prize is the largest non-fiction history prize in the world. It’s important because it reflects a genuine desire to reward historians and researchers for publications which are “determined to have had, or likely to have, a profound literary, social and intellectual impact.” The Cundill Prize website states that they aim to recognise “outstanding works of non-fiction that are grounded in scholarly research while retaining wide appeal and interest to the general public.”

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How to read from 5 different genres when you’re flat broke

If you don’t live near a library then this is the post for you. Whether you’re a cash-strapped student, you’ve overspent, or you’re miles away from pay-day, there are ways to indulge your bookish habit without spending more than you’d like to. This post is going to clue you in on five ways to read from five different genres, at no extra cost at all.

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“Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what’s for lunch.” Five recipes inspired by literary favourites.

 

You may think you’re too wrapped up in your current book to stop to eat, but today I’ve pulled together five recipes from five different literary classics or from favourite authors, which you could make this weekend. After all, as George Bernard Shaw once said “There is no love sincerer than the love of food.”

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